History, Mythology, & Types

History

African Bushmen discover the first mead known to man. It’s said that bees would nest in rotted out Baobab tress during the dry times before being flooded out during seasons of torrential down pours.

Water + Honey + Time = Mead

20,000 Years Ago

The first evidence of mead production comes from pottery discovered from Ancient Crete.

8,000 Years Ago

During the Golden Age, the Grecians coined the popular term ‘Ambrosia’ or ‘Nectar of the Gods’ when referring to mead. The likes of Aristotle and Plato et all of the philosopher kings were said to be avid consumers.

Ancient Greece

The age of kings and queens also brought about the height of mead. It was the definitive beverage of choice amongst royalty, and the brewers were almost considered royalty themselves.

The Middle Ages

Marco Polo is believed to be partly responsible for the decline of mead in European culture. On the fabled journeyman’s travels to the Silk Road of the Mongol Empire, he discovered sugarcane and brought it back to Europe. The production of sugar as a sweetner took hold as it was much cheaper to produce than honey, and so demand suffered.

800 Years Ago

In 1857, an Austrian inventor made the Centrifugal Honey Extractor, more efficiently extracting honey from hives, resulting in less material for the creation of mead. Before this invention, the hives were simply crushed, leaving lots of honey laden beeswax that was then processed by rinsing it with water which effectively created mead.

Industrial Revolution

Mead has yet to return to its height, but is making a strong push in the burgeoning craft beverage industry. It’s seen more growth than craft beer in the last year as more and more people are rediscovering the first and most natural libation known to man.

Present Day

Mythology

Norse

Norse

Mead has a rich history in Viking mythology. Just one highlight is that warriors that died in battle would ascend to Valhalla where they would be greeted with a large glass of mead.

Greek

Greek

Greeks believed that mead was literally the nectar of the gods, and that it’s origins came from dew that was then collected by bees and processed into the beverage.

Celtic

Celtic

The Celts believed that a river of mead flowed through paradise. They also believed mead had special magic powers of healing and more.

Types

Great Mead
Hydromel
Melomel
Methelgin
Pyment
Cyser
Braggot
Sparkling Mead
Rhodomel
Coffeamel
Capsicumel
Morat
Black Mead
Omphacomel
Viking Blood
Sima
Oxymel
Acerglyn
Bochet
Mulled Mead
Hippocras